After Alex passed away in May of 2014, his website was killed off and the domain wound up on sale via an anonymous listing for 1576 dollars ... There are those who claim to help the poor but sell for significant sums (from the view of the poor) so many books that were meant to be free (ask those who wrote them)! Alex always gave cd3wd away for free, below cost, or even at cost when he really needed to replenish his money ... and his many hours were never counted in the cost ... it was always free for us, the youth, and that shall carry on. There is a long story not yet brought to light about those who killed off his .com domain ... but we move along and leave that in the Hands of our CREATOR who will bring all hidden things to light when it most suits HIM...


Here in Copperbelt Zambia, we have a room in our library named in memory of Alex Weir, and we have long used hard copies in training youth to be self-reliant, some for the classes only, some as 'take-away'. The knowledge and skills for self-reliance are the foundation of true freedom. We are not the only place in Zambia with reading rooms that flourished from the kindness of Alex Weir. (See Chinsali ZAM) We know of others in Africa and Asia, but only heaven knows how far Alex's good works have really travelled.


We know of one place where an older version of Alex's early compilations is still online ... see here ... and you can thank Travis for this one, and seek out his excellent e-works and kit-offerings on aquaponics. We also have e-files of some of Alex's 2012 and even some 2013 DVDs, perhaps among the very last compilations he did before he left the toils and troubles of earth behind. We will make more of those e-files available when we are able to get the 'connections' (internet) and find the hours to get that done ... Alex's name will not just fade away in places like Zambia, among those he worked so hard to serve down here, upon the Footstool of our MASTER in heaven.


Alex was inspired by the great work of Dick Day, best known for fair trade pricing for the poor folk who actually grow all that food. Dick Day was an engineer, as was Alex. Neither of them let the overly formal training of modern universities blind their hearts nor endear their pockets so much to the schemes of the rich. May they both be fondly remembered, and spark more good efforts among African youth as we lift our own neighbours for the sake of all of our villages, and the future children, just as Dick Day and Alex Weir did when following their own hearts.


A Memorial Library

...About Those Free Books ...